Saturday, 1 April 2017

Australian Garage by the Lords Of Gravity - The Curse Of Icarus (2012) Flac

Lords Of Gravity are Australia’s Premier Garage-Punk outfit!!!  The four-piece outfit deliver the finest example of 1960’s pop-punk and surf influenced rock’n’roll! Including members of The Stoneage Hearts, The Crusaders, Hands Of Time, The Finkers, The Seminal Rats.

Heavily influenced by the sixties garage bands these guys are not retro, they sound like they are from the sixties. Garage Rock at its best.
Enjoy it loud
Cheers   Frank     


Flac1  You need both links!   Flac2
         
           mp3@320

Lolas - Let's Rock Rave & Shout


Alabama-based power pop/bubblegum combo the Lolas formed in 1998 around vocalist/guitarist Tim Boykin (ex-Shame Idols), drummer Mark Reynolds, and bassist Walon Smith. They debuted with the Ballerina Breakout LP a year later, and followed it with Silver Dollar Sunday in 2001.
Both albums were issued through the indie Jam! Between albums the Lolas did some touring, and recorded a blisteringly faithful version of "Color Me Impressed" for the 2001 Replacements tribute on Facedown entitled Left of the Dial. 2004 saw the release of Something You Oughta Know, again on Jam!.(allmusic.com)


Like all albums of the Lolas this is also a top notch effort. Great guitars and great songs which are inspired in sixties garage sound. This is really a great but very underrated band. Highly recommended. And this time again with artwork! :-)
Have fun
               Frank  mp3@320

Power Pop: Lolas - Doctor Apache (2006 Wizzard In Vinyl Rec) mp3

This is the fifth release by the Lolas and this is finest power pop. A very nice album that reminds me sometimes a little bit of the Shoes. Tim Boykin and the band are in high shape here. For Power Pop lovers a must. Sorry no artwork :-(
Enjoy
         Frank  mp3@320

The Golden Gate - Year One (1968 (2009, Now Sounds) Flac


Year One album for sale by Golden Gate was released Aug 11, 2009 on the Now Sounds label. Billy Carlucci and Reid Whitelaw were a pair of New York-based songwriters who, after kicking around the business for several years, hit paydirt in 1968 when they wrote the tune "Goody Goody Gumdrops" for the 1910 Fruitgum Company. Year One songs It was the first of a string of pop songs the team would write for the Kasenetz-Katz bubblegum empire, and they formed a bubblegum act of their own, Marshmallow Way, who cut an album for United Artists.
Year One album for sale But by 1970, Carlucci and Whitelaw had ambitions to make music that was classier and more mature, and they signed a deal with Audio Fidelity Records for their new project. Year One CD music The Golden Gate combined polished pop tunes and a production that matched the well-crafted pop/rock of acts like the Buckinghams with horn-based arrangements in the manner of Chicago and Blood, Sweat & Tears. The Golden Gate's one and only album, YEAR ONE, is a notably more ambitious and less gimmicky work than Carlucci and Whitelaw had delivered in the past; with a handful of top studio musicians backing them up and the vocal group the Tradewinds adding background harmonies, YEAR ONE's craft is impeccable (beyond a few shaky vocal moments that reveal these guys were songwriters first), and the production and arrangements are a canny reflection of both the style of the day and the studio-centered pop background of the composers/bandleaders.
Billy Carlucci and Reid Whitelaw were a pair of New York-based songwriters who, after kicking around the business for several years, hit paydirt in 1968 when they wrote the tune "Goody Goody Gumdrops" for the 1910 Fruitgum Company. It was the first of a string of pop songs the team would write for the Kasenetz-Katz bubblegum empire, and they formed a bubblegum act of their own, Marshmallow Way, who cut an album for United Artists. But by 1970, Carlucci and Whitelaw had ambitions to make music that was classier and more mature, and they signed a deal with Audio Fidelity Records for their new project.
The Golden Gate combined polished pop tunes and a production that matched the well-crafted pop/rock of acts like the Buckinghams with horn-based arrangements in the manner of Chicago and Blood, Sweat & Tears. The Golden Gate's one and only album, YEAR ONE, is a notably more ambitious and less gimmicky work than Carlucci and Whitelaw had delivered in the past; with a handful of top studio musicians backing them up and the vocal group the Tradewinds adding background harmonies, YEAR ONE's craft is impeccable (beyond a few shaky vocal moments that reveal these guys were songwriters first), and the production and arrangements are a canny reflection of both the style of the day and the studio-centered pop background of the composers/bandleaders.
  
Very good sunshine/bubblegum with brill building influence. To me a strong effort. Strong melodies and the horn arrangements are very tasteful. Very good effort.

Have fun
               Frank    
                                                FLAC

Ringo Starr - Photograph: The Very Best Of Ringo Starr (2007 Capitol) Flac

Hard as it is to believe but there has not been a proper Ringo Starr hits collection since the first, 1975's Blast from Your Past -- that's not counting 1989's Starr Struck: Best of Ringo Starr, Vol. 2, which was designed as a companion to that earlier set -- until 2007's Photograph: The Very Best of Ringo Starr. Blast from Your Past was released just five years after his debut, Sentimental Journey, but it ignored that collection of pop standards, along with much of its country cousin Beaucoups of Blues, winding up as a collection of highlights of 1973's Ringo and 1974's Goodnight Vienna, with a few non-LP hit singles rounded up within the LP's tight ten-track, 30-minute span. Ringo kept recording after Blast, working his way through several labels and ill-advised phases before settling into a nice, easy groove with 1993's Time Takes Time, but he stopped having hits not long after 1975, after the Elton John/Bernie Taupin "Snookeroo" climbed all the way to number three, capping off a remarkable streak of seven Top Ten singles.
After that, the crash was fast: "Oo-Wee" was pulled off of Vienna and stalled at 31, then there was just one more hit -- "A Dose of Rock & Roll," peaking at 26 in 1976 -- before a five-year wait until the George Harrison-written "Wrack My Brain" limped to 38 in 1981 before Ringo disappeared from the charts. His '90s comeback may have never dented Billboard, but it is represented on the 20-track Photograph, which also contains all the aforementioned singles (apart from "Oo-Wee," no great loss) and the entirety of Blast from Your Past, albeit presented in a different running order. This doesn't just make for a compilation that's longer than the 1975 set, it makes for one that's better, since it adds the terrific "(It's All Down to) Good Night Vienna" to the mix, along with the amiable 1976 cover of Bruce Channel's "Hey Baby," a duet with Buck Owens on "Act Naturally" from 1989, and a well-chosen selection from each of Time Takes Time, 1998's Vertical Man, 2003's Ringorama, and 2005's Choose Love. This may not hit all the great stuff from the early '70s -- after all, the whole of Ringo is exceptionally strong -- but it does cut out all the real embarrassing stuff from the late '70s and just concentrates on the good latter-day material that holds its own with the best of his '70s hits.
Far from merely being songs that are good when graded on a curve, these hits have aged really well, especially his originals: "It Don't Come Easy," the thundering glam rocker "Back Off Boogaloo," the cheerfully post-Beatles autobiography of "Early 1970" and "Photograph," his gorgeous collaboration with George, which lends this comp its title and ranks as among the very best post-Beatles songs by any of the Fab Four. That tune proves Ringo could deliver music every bit as memorable as his colleagues and much of this excellent, long overdue compilation is at a similar high standard.
[Photograph: The Very Best of Ringo Starr also includes entertaining track-by-track commentary from Ringo and was also released in a deluxe edition that contains a wonderful DVD with the videos for "Sentimental Journey," "It Don't Come Easy," "Back Off Boogaloo," "You're Sixteen," "Only You (And You Alone)" (which also features Harry Nilsson), and "Act Naturally," along with an ad for Goodnight Vienna.]

Very good compilation of Ringo songs taken (the most) by his albums he had released in his career till 2007. Ringo Starr is just great. He was a part of the greatest band in pop music of the 20th century. He is a great musician. He had a lot of hits. This man don't must not to prove anything to anyone. But exactly this makes ''Photograph''. It shows me (once again) what a great artist and humorous human being he is.
Have fun
               Frank   Flac

Manfred Mann - The Singles Plus (1963 - 1966) (1987 EMI) Flac


This 25-song CD (originally a shorter LP called The Singles Album) is a handy collection of the band's most well-known English tracks from 1963 through 1966, plus their B-sides and some songs off of EPs that charted high in the U.K. Except for the final three songs -- "Groovin'," "Can't Believe It," and "Did You Have to Do That?," none of which are that easy to find on compilations -- it's all assembled in chronological order from their debut single "Why Should We Not" to 1966's "You Gave Me Somebody to Love."
The notes by John Tobler are a bit superficial, and the American EMI Manfred Mann: The Definitive Collection is a little more adventurous. Also, the sound here doesn't match the presence and clarity of more recent 24-bit transfers. Nonetheless, this is a respectable compilation for the novice or the casual fan. The presence of the B-sides, including lost gems like "What Did I Do Wrong" (a killer Chess-style blues number written by Tom McGuinness) and the Goffin/King-authored "Oh No Not My Baby" (one of Paul Jones's greatest R&B-style performances), assures that one gets a truer picture of the band's output and their focus on R&B, jazz, blues, and folk, than the A-sides by themselves would provide.

Enjoy!
          Frank  Flac  Link expire 2017-04-15

Psychedelic Garage Pop: The Boston Tea Party - The Boston Tea Party 1968 (2010 Dogtoire) Flac


The Boston Tea Party actually happened in beautiful, downtown Burbank, where five young guys got together in 1963 to strike out for their own brand of musical independence. Truly revolutionary in spirit, the group is unique in that it has no “leader”. Each of the members, all accomplished musicians, contributes his share of musical ideas. The result of this communal effort is an infinite variety of messages with more precise musicianship, more exciting performances, than might have happened under the tutelage of a single driving force.cares. As does every member of the group.
Richard DePerna, bass guitarist and arranger, insists that the group’s in-person sound be as excellent as their recorded performances. Mike Stevens, lead guitarist, writes much of the material which is original, topical and abundant in richly poetic imagery. Organist Robert DePerna and Drummer Dave Novogroski are the men responsible for holding together The Boston Tea Party’s tight ensemble sound. Travis Fields, lead singer–who also writes material for the group–has that rare gift of addressing the listener in a very personal way. 
Visually, The Boston Tea Party is a knock-out (you’ll see them in a forthcoming American-International film) in costumes of the 1775 era. But there the gimmicks end. After all is said and done, it’s the music–a pure, unique, accomplished sound–of The Boston Tea Party that’s going to make history.”(somerecords.wordpress.com)

Nice Garage Pop from 1968.
Enjoy
         Frank   Flac