Monday, 27 March 2017

Psychedelic Pop of the '60s: Nirvana- All Of Us 1968 (2003 Island Universal) Flac

Nirvana's second album was dainty period British pop-psychedelia, falling on the lightest shade of that category that could be imagined. For some adventurous pop fans, few higher recommendations could be concocted. For most 1960s collectors, though, it's fair to say that it's too precious and insubstantial to qualify as a major work. Their most well-known song, "Rainbow Chaser," leads off, with its prominent phasing effects; "Tiny Goddess," one of their best ballads, comes next.
The rest of the album doesn't measure up to those two tracks, with pretty but not compelling melodies (sometimes reminiscent of, but not in the same class as, Paul McCartney) and orchestration that, like the songs themselves, seem to tiptoe for fear of being too forceful. The overall result is too saccharine, and occasionally even childish.


That's an Mr Unterberger review again. Nothing more to say.

If you like it enjoy it...if not Macca would sing..let it be...
Enjoy
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Psychedelic Pop: Bit 'A Sweet - Hypnotic 1 (1968) (2011) Flac


Bit a Sweet was reportedly a top draw at the big discotheques in New York City. Their only album, Hypnotic -- released by ABC in 1968 -- is a rare, and often over-looked, high-concept pop-psych album of the first degree. Today it is highly praised by collectors who are interested in psych-pop production values (phased vocals, electric sitar, strings, fuzz guitar). Bit a Sweet was produced by the multi-talented Steve Duboff, who also wrote most of the group's material, including both sides of their heavily edited "2086"/"Second Time" single.
Duboff's sometime songwriting partner on this album, incidentally, was Artie Kornfeld, who -- during this time -- was producing the Cowsills for Mercury; their "How Can I Make You See" also appears here. Another highlights include Bit a Sweet's version of the George Harrison-penned Beatle track "If I Needed Someone." (Incidentally, Kornfeld and Duboff also recorded under the moniker Changin' Times). In February 1967, a year prior to the release of this album, Bit a Sweet covered the Steve Duboff-Dave Morris-penned "Out of Sight, Out of Mind," which was released on MGM (cover versions were also waxed by the Marauders and Limey & the Yanks).
This song -- which unfortunately isn't featured on their debut -- is probably the group's best-known song. If you're curious, you can see it performed, along with one other selection, during the first few minutes of the sexploitation flick Blonde on a Bum Trip, and can also be found on several psychedelic compilations . Drummer Russell Leslie later recorded with a band called Neon (produced by Tommy James) and became a session drummer.(allusic.com)

Very good psychedelic pop here. Good songs and well produced this is one of the better pop psychedelia of the times then back.
Have fun
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Andwella's Dream - Love And Poetry (1969) 2004 Japan Flac

Andwellas Dream released one album, Love and Poetry, on CBS in the UK in the late 1960s that is highly regarded by some psychedelic collectors. It is an eclectic but unmemorable affair that touches upon a number of approaches--heavy progressive rock-tinged psychedelia with keyboards, fruity pop-psych with strings and fairytale-type lyrics, folk- and blues-informed material bridging psych and prog--common to British rock of the period. The group changed their name to Andwella and subsequently released a couple of albums under that name.(allmusic.com)

Although Andwella's Dream were a versatile psychedelic group, they were nonetheless generic no matter what angle they were taking. On Love & Poetry, you get sustained guitar that walks the line between freakbeat and heaviness, some swirling organ and husky vocals that betray the influence of Traffic and Procol Harum, pastoral acoustic folky tunes in the Donovan style, airy-fairy dabs of phased guitars and storybook lyrics, etc. Eclecticism is to be commended, and since late-'60s British psychedelia is an interesting genre in and of itself, generic music in the subgenre is more interesting than some other generic music in other styles. Still, generic music is generic music, and being able to do a bunch of different things in an unexceptional manner does not make you exceptional. The fairly tuneful folk-rocker "Midday Sun" is the best cut; it's also interesting to hear a song about "Cocaine" in 1969, before the drug was too well known even in the counterculture.(allmusic.com)


Very nice psychedelic prog pop album. If you don't know it give it a try.
Cheers
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